DIGITAL
HEALTH
LANDSCAPE™

mHealth
Health and Wellness Apps
Health 2.0/Social Media
eHealth
Sensors and Wearables
EHR/EMR
Big Data
Personal Genomics
Health IT
Gamification
Quantified
Self
Telehealth/
Connected Health
Inter-
operability
Medical Imaging

Digital Health is a broad term. It embraces all healthcare related applications, technologies and delivery systems that result from the confluence of medicine, genomics, sports, health and wellness, and the technologies that comprise the digital space.

It includes sub-specialties such as telemedicine, ehealth, mhealth, EMR/EHR, genomics, Big Data, Health IT, Health 2.0, social media, sensors and wearables, and health and wellness apps. These interconnected technologies embrace the entire spectrum of healthcare and all involved stakeholders-ensuring the delivery of cutting-edge care that's comprehensive, collaborative, efficient, and individualized to the patient's needs.

The global demand for healthcare is exploding. Growing and aging populations, an increase in "affluence disease," and changes in regulatory and reimbursement environments are just some of the many factors that are impacting the face of healthcare as we know it. The result is a need for new answers to meet an array of growing and evolving challenges.

We believe the answer lies in the digital health revolution.

It promises essential solutions for meeting the Triple Aim of healthcare: increased access, improved quality, and decreased cost—which together support enhanced patient and provider satisfaction. A variety of digital health applications can be used to enhance the state of healthcare across the globe, supported by ongoing advances in science and technology. Indeed, the value of the world health IT market is expected to grow at 10.2% per annum between 2010 and 2015 to reach a value of over $162 billion.Fresh ideas that were once thought impossible are now being realized by advances in digital health science and technologies.

Population Health

There are a variety of definitions of population health, including the belief that the health status and/or health outcomes of a group of individuals is influenced by common factors of defined groups such as socioeconomic status, geographical location, ethnicity, genetic influence, location of employment, etc.

Additionally, population health is sometimes referred to in terms of the accountability of healthcare delivery systems for the health outcomes of defined populations that they are responsible for.

mHealth

mHealth stands for mobile health, and refers to the ability to provide and receive healthcare and information using mobile devices such as smartphones and tablets.

9.4 million - the number of patients worldwide expected to use connected health monitoring devices by 2017 (Pinsent Masons 2013)
61% - the expected CAGR of total mHealth market by 2017 (Research2Guidance 2013)
$26 billion- the expected value of the global mHealth market by 2017 (Research2Guidance 2013)
100,000 - the number of health apps available for smartphones (MIT Technology Review 2014)

Health and Wellness Apps

Health and wellness apps are mobile programs that offer health-related services on smartphones, tablets, and other communication devices. There are many types of health and wellness apps which focus on various aspects of disease prevention by supporting a healthy lifestyle.

62% - the increase in usage of health and fitness apps in the first half of 2014 (Flurry 2014)
231 million, global installations of the top 20 free sports, fitness and health apps in 2013 (IHS 2013)

Health 2.0/Social Media

The explosion of health-related resources on the Internet has created a type of "Next-Generation" approach to healthcare through the use of these dynamic tools. These tools change the traditional one-to-one patient-doctor dialogue to one-to-many and many-to-many dialogues between doctors-patients, patients-patients and doctors-doctors at a phenomenal speed.

94% - the number of social media users with medical conditions in America willing to anonymously share health data (IOM 2014)

Personal Genomics

Advances in technology have increased efficiencies and decreased costs for sequencing and analyzing the personal genome. Applications for personal genomics are many, including the ability to support preventive care by identifying disease potential and support precision medicine with personalized treatments.

11% - the expected annual growth in the personal genomics market (Price Waterhouse Coopers)
230 - the average number of studies in which a consenting 23andMe customer's genomic data is used (MIT Technology Review Vol 117 No.5)

eHealth

eHealth is a broad term that includes the use of information and communication technologies (ICT) to provide and receive healthcare information and support the delivery of care. Many other digital health sub-specialties fall within this category.

130 million - the number of doctor - patient video consultations expected in 2018 (Park Associates 2014)
69% - the number of US adults willing to communicate with providers by email (PWC 2013)

Sensors and Wearables

Advances in microelectronics, sensor manufacturing, and data analysis have created many new possibilities to use sensors and wearables to support health. Since they allow continual monitoring, valuable information can be obtained to both guide treatment and support behavior change.

81% - the number of digital fitness trackers that will be connected by 2018 (Parks Associates 2014)
7.6 million - the projected number of units wearable companies will have shipped by the end of 2014 (PWC 2014)

EHR/EMR

One of the earliest applications of digital health, electronic medical records are used to maintain a comprehensive digital patient record. Used in clinical settings, they help to improve the quality of care by providing healthcare professionals across the care continuum with ready access to essential patient information.

91% - the number of physicians surveyed who are actively using electronic medical records (Accenture 2013)
$24.4 billion - the amount of Federal incentives paid to doctors and hospitals for adopting EHRs (MIT Technology Review Vol 117 No.5)

Big Data

Within the digital health industry, big data refers to the use of data science techniques to capture and analyze huge and complex datasets to achieve specific goals. This includes the use of dynamic algorithms to create predictive models which may help to guide both business and clinical decisions.

25% - the expected CAGR of healthcare analytics to 2019 (Research and Markets 2014)
90% - the percentage of all stored information attributed to personal sensor data within the next decade (Robert Wood Johnson Foundation 2009)
$300 billion - the expected annual value of health data in US healthcare (McKinsey 2011)

Precision Medicine

Precision medicine is an individualized approach to treating diseases and supporting prevention which takes into account a number of factors, including individual gene variability, environment, and lifestyle.

According to Dr. Eric Topol, it is optimized by the integration of "multi-omics", clinical and real world data. Precision medicine can both be created by and delivered through a wide array of digital health applications.

Health IT

Health IT includes the use of a variety of technologies to exchange and interact with health-related information. Those who use such systems include patients, providers, hospitals, governments, insurers and other stakeholders.

$56.7 billion - the expected growth of the global health IT market by 2017 (MarketsAndMarkets 2013)
100% - the annual growth in digital health funding since 2013 (Rock Health 2014)

mHealth

mHealth stands for mobile health, and refers to the ability to provide and receive healthcare and information using mobile devices such as smartphones and tablets.

9.4 million - the number of patients worldwide expected to use connected health monitoring devices by 2017 (Pinsent Masons 2013)
61% - the expected CAGR of total mHealth market by 2017 (Research2Guidance 2013)
$26 billion- the expected value of the global mHealth market by 2017 (Research2Guidance 2013)
100,000 - the number of health apps available for smartphones (MIT Technology Review 2014)

EHR/EMR

One of the earliest applications of digital health, electronic medical records are used to maintain a comprehensive digital patient record. Used in clinical settings, they help to improve the quality of care by providing healthcare professionals across the care continuum with ready access to essential patient information.

91% - the number of physicians surveyed who are actively using electronic medical records (Accenture 2013)
$24.4 billion - the amount of Federal incentives paid to doctors and hospitals for adopting EHRs (MIT Technology Review Vol 117 No.5)

Big Data

Within the digital health industry, big data refers to the use of data science techniques to capture and analyze huge and complex datasets to achieve specific goals. This includes the use of dynamic algorithms to create predictive models which may help to guide both business and clinical decisions.

25% - the expected CAGR of healthcare analytics to 2019 (Research and Markets 2014)
90% - the percentage of all stored information attributed to personal sensor data within the next decade (Robert Wood Johnson Foundation 2009)
$300 billion - the expected annual value of health data in US healthcare (McKinsey 2011)

Personal Genomics

Advances in technology have increased efficiencies and decreased costs for sequencing and analyzing the personal genome. Applications for personal genomics are many, including the ability to support preventive care by identifying disease potential and support precision medicine with personalized treatments.

11% - the expected annual growth in the personal genomics market (Price Waterhouse Coopers)
230 - the average number of studies in which a consenting 23andMe customer's genomic data is used (MIT Technology Review Vol 117 No.5)

Consumer Engagement

The explosion of affordable devices, improvements in communications technologies, the expansion of the Internet and the digitization of healthcare have all merged to create new opportunities for consumers to engage in their own healthcare as never before.

A variety of digital health applications support consumer empowerment to both increase prevention and treat disease.

mHealth

mHealth stands for mobile health, and refers to the ability to provide and receive healthcare and information using mobile devices such as smartphones and tablets.

9.4 million - the number of patients worldwide expected to use connected health monitoring devices by 2017 (Pinsent Masons 2013)
61% - the expected CAGR of total mHealth market by 2017 (Research2Guidance 2013)
$26 billion- the expected value of the global mHealth market by 2017 (Research2Guidance 2013)
100,000 - the number of health apps available for smartphones (MIT Technology Review 2014)

Gamification

Gamification helps to create fun and engaging experiences, converting users into players. In digital health, gamification is often used to aid in wellness, disease prevention, medication adherence, and medical education.

67.2% - the expected CAGR of the overall gamification market by 2018 (MarketsAndMarkets 2013)
2008 - the year the term "gamification" was originally coined.

Health and Wellness Apps

Health and wellness apps are mobile programs that offer health-related services on smartphones, tablets, and other communication devices. There are many types of health and wellness apps which focus on various aspects of disease prevention by supporting a healthy lifestyle.

62% - the increase in usage of health and fitness apps in the first half of 2014 (Flurry 2014)
231 million, global installations of the top 20 free sports, fitness and health apps in 2013 (IHS 2013)

Health 2.0/Social Media

The explosion of health-related resources on the Internet has created a type of "Next-Generation" approach to healthcare through the use of these dynamic tools. These tools change the traditional one-to-one patient-doctor dialogue to one-to-many and many-to-many dialogues between doctors-patients, patients-patients and doctors-doctors at a phenomenal speed.

94% - the number of social media users with medical conditions in America willing to anonymously share health data (IOM 2014)

Sensors and Wearables

Advances in microelectronics, sensor manufacturing and data analysis have created many new possibilities to use sensors and wearables to support health. Since they allow continual monitoring, valuable information can be obtained to both guide treatment and support behavior change.

81% - the number of digital fitness trackers that will be connected by 2018 (Parks Associates 2014)
7.6 million - the projected number of units wearable companies will have shipped by the end of 2014 (PWC 2014)

Quantified Self

Quantified self is a movement that incorporates technology such as sensors and wearables data on various aspects of an individual's life, especially health and fitness. The aim is to improve self-sensing, self-awareness, and human performance in order to maintain or improve one's health.

70Million - the number of personal health and wellness products to be sold in 2018 (Parks Associates 2014)
70% - the number of US adults who say they track at least one health indicator (Pew 2014)

Telehealth/Connected Health

Telemedicine enables healthcare professionals to provide care and consultation remotely through technologies such as videoconferencing. Telehealth is broader and includes disease prevention and health promotion using technology. Connected health refers to a model in which patients are more engaged, and able to "connect" with their care using technology.

$8 billion - the expected sales of connected health products in the U.S. by 2018 (Parks Associates 2014)
$36 billion- the amount remote patient monitoring devices are expected to save the world's healthcare systems by 2018 (Juniper Research 2013)
20% - the reduction in emergency hospital admissions in the UK due to the use of telehealth (Healthcare UK 2013)
45% - the reduction in mortality rates in the UK due to the use of telehealth (Healthcare UK 2013)

eHealth

eHealth is a broad term that includes the use of information and communication technologies (ICT) to provide and receive healthcare information and support the deli very of care. Many other digital health sub-specialties fall within this category.

130 million - the number of doctor - patient video consultations expected in 2018 (Park Associates 2014)
69% - the number of US adults willing to communicate with providers by email (PWC 2013)

Continuity of Care

Individuals benefit most from care that is provided along a comprehensive continuum in which all health professionals involved have access to common essential information which is critical to the provision of optimal care.

Continuity of care disables fragmentation, allowing patients to receive the best care from providers who have a comprehensive picture of all details of a patient's health history and current status. Interoperability is a key factor in ensuring that this essential health information exchange takes place.

mHealth

mHealth stands for mobile health, and refers to the ability to provide and receive healthcare and information using mobile devices such as smartphones and tablets.

9.4 million - the number of patients worldwide expected to use connected health monitoring devices by 2017 (Pinsent Masons 2013)
61% - the expected CAGR of total mHealth market by 2017 (Research2Guidance 2013)
$26 billion- the expected value of the global mHealth market by 2017 (Research2Guidance 2013)
100,000 - the number of health apps available for smartphones (MIT Technology Review 2014)

eHealth

eHealth is a broad term that includes the use of information and communication technologies (ICT) to provide and receive healthcare information and support the deli very of care. Many other digital health sub-specialties fall within this category.

130 million - the number of doctor - patient video consultations expected in 2018 (Park Associates 2014)
69% - the number of US adults willing to communicate with providers by email (PWC 2013)

Sensors and Wearables

Advances in microelectronics, sensor manufacturing and data analysis have created many new possibilities to use sensors and wearables to support health. Since they allow continual monitoring, valuable information can be obtained to both guide treatment and support behavior change.

81% - the number of digital fitness trackers that will be connected by 2018 (Parks Associates 2014)
7.6 million - the projected number of units wearable companies will have shipped by the end of 2014 (PWC 2014)

Telehealth/Connected Health

Telemedicine enables healthcare professionals to provide care and consultation remotely through technologies such as videoconferencing. Telehealth is broader and includes disease prevention and health promotion using technology. Connected health refers to a model in which patients are more engaged, and able to "connect" with their care using technology.

$8 billion - the expected sales of connected health products in the U.S. by 2018 (Parks Associates 2014)
$36 billion- the amount remote patient monitoring devices are expected to save the world's healthcare systems by 2018 (Juniper Research 2013)
20% - the reduction in emergency hospital admissions in the UK due to the use of telehealth (Healthcare UK 2013)
45% - the reduction in mortality rates in the UK due to the use of telehealth (Healthcare UK 2013)

EHR/EMR

One of the earliest applications of digital health, electronic medical records are used to maintain a comprehensive digital patient record. Used in clinical settings, they help to improve the quality of care by providing healthcare professionals across the care continuum with ready access to essential patient information.

91% - the number of physicians surveyed who are actively using electronic medical records (Accenture 2013)
$24.4 billion - the amount of Federal incentives paid to doctors and hospitals for adopting EHRs (MIT Technology Review Vol 117 No.5)

INTEROPERABILITY

Interoperability refers to the ability for different information technology systems to share and interact with health information regardless of the application or application vendor. It is a key principle that supports data and information sharing to optimize the potential of digital health.

89% - the number of providers who report that electronic data exchanges are effective (HealthIT.gov 2012)

Medical Imaging

Medical imaging refers to techniques and processes used to create images of various parts of the human body for diagnostic and treatment purposes. The new era of digitizing medical images creates the potential for them to be shared across a variety of health information systems to optimize patient care.

$49 billion - the expected value of the global medical imaging device market by 2020 (Research and Markets 2013)

Health IT

Health IT includes the use of a variety of technologies to exchange and interact with health-related information. Those who use such systems include patients, providers, hospitals, governments, insurers and other stakeholders.

$56.7 billion - the expected growth of the global health IT market by 2017 (MarketsAndMarkets 2013)
100% - the annual growth in digital health funding since 2013 (Rock Health 2014)
Select one of the sub-specialities in our Digital Health Landscape diagram to find out more or use the buttons to the left to see how the Digital Health Landscape relates to you